surgery

Treatment options for UK & Irish members; including VHI & HSE criteria for funding and E112 Applications etc.

Re: surgery

Postby Alan1646 » Sat Jun 01, 2013 1:46 pm

I wish you well in whatever you decide to do Andrea. Sometimes there is no perfect answer / ideal solution to life's problems and we just have to make the best decisions we can after thinking things through.
"if you want to keep a secret you must also hide it from yourself" Orwell
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Re: surgery

Postby helenlegs 11 » Sat Jun 01, 2013 2:34 pm

If there was a Like button as on facebook I would 'like' your post above Alan :)
So true.
Take care,
Helen
Fall 2008. Misdiagnosed with lumber spine problem. MRN June 2010 indicated pudendal entrapment at Alcocks canal. Diagnosed with complex variant piriformis syndrome with sciatic, pudendal and gluteal entrapment's by Dr Filler 2010.Guided piriformis botox injection 2011 Bristol. 2013, Nerve conduction test positive; new spinal MRI scan negative, so diagnosed for the 4th time with pelvic nerve entrapment, now recognised as Sciatic, pudendal, PFCN and cluneal nerves at piriformis level.
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Re: surgery

Postby Lenny33 » Sat Jun 01, 2013 4:30 pm

Hi Andrea, I echo Alans wise words, often pn sufferers haven't got much in the tank to deal with increased pain after surgery never mind the psychological effects. Alan mentions the key questions you should ask any surgeon. He is right. A capable surgeon will be more than happy to answer and have nothing to hide. I didn't ask these questions to Bristol team who appear sugary coated on outside but I feel have failed me ethically, morally, professionally & surgically. The result is more pain. My further investigations have shocked and appalled. The key question Alan raises is the most important of all - will they help the pain? What is the evidence they have surgically helped (not listened to or made someone feel special) anyone with pn? I have not read of a single person, not one. Helen, you talk of their compassion - Firstly I thought dixon was least compassionate person I have ever met, but what evidence is there that this perceived compassion is no better than the smarmy salesmen who call selling double glazing, they hang on your every word, laugh in right places, act really interested and concerned but ultimately it's about one thing, money! Suffering from this terrible condition makes you vulnerable. Andrea I admire your decision for surgery and hope things work out for you in all aspects of your life.
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Re: surgery

Postby chillijava » Sat Jun 01, 2013 6:31 pm

hi len
have you raised your concerns with the doctors involved or even the hospital you were in and if so what was the outcome and if you havent maybe you should. mr dixon is an acquired taste but i have always found him honest and direct with his answers he has never sugar coated anything i have asked or not asked if it comes to that. any surgery is a risk and i know there is a chance it could make my pain worse, but i do not have a lot of choice. if you believe that you have been mis treated i am sure there are avenues you can go down to get some answers or recompense

andrea
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Re: surgery

Postby Painful Man » Mon Jun 10, 2013 3:52 pm

I have just visited and logged on for the first time in several weeks and picked up on this discussion.

Firstly, Andrea, I hope you are feeling somewhat better, and I wish you all the best if you go ahead with the surgery option. As for myself I have been recommended for surgery and will see Mr Dixon later this month. We'll see what comes out of the meeting.

Secondly, whilst it is always going to be difficult to know when to follow advice, I incline to follow the advice of experienced professionals. Not because they cannot be wrong, we know they can, but because they are regulated and bound by codes of practice. It is not in their interests to get it wrong. They do not want to be sued, struck off etc.

I give serious thought to all views expressed here on this forum, but at the end of the day I know the decision I take on surgery will be between myself and the regulated professionals I deal with.

In the meantime I wish everyone relief from this dreadful condition, and hopefully some comfortable sitting.

Regards
P_M
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Re: surgery

Postby Lenny33 » Tue Jun 11, 2013 10:47 pm

Hello painful man, in response to your comment. Private treatment is far less regulated. If you are seeing Dixon on the nhs you are on fairly safe ground. Seeing him privately gives you virtually nil redress. Taking advice from a professional rather than someone on a forum is clearly good thinking. I also asked advice of fellow professionals following my treatment of what I received. All were hugely critical. Do your research on sgy rates, referral stats to each other & success rates. You might come to a different conclusion to myself and many consultants. I wish you well, Len
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Re: surgery

Postby Alan1646 » Wed Jun 12, 2013 12:32 pm

Lenny33 wrote: Do your research on sgy rates, referral stats to each other & success rates. You might come to a different conclusion to myself and many consultants. I wish you well, Len


Are the success rates for PN surgery at Bristol actually published? If not , the only source of information will be the medical staff you can speak to there. I wonder if anyone has been told these statistics-it would be very interesting to know.

You would also need to know what criteria they use for "success".
"if you want to keep a secret you must also hide it from yourself" Orwell
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Re: surgery

Postby molly » Wed Jun 12, 2013 1:39 pm

I agree with Lenny, I think private practise whilst most of the time is excellant, there are those who will act notnecessarily in the patients best interests.

It is also VERY VERY, difficult to pusue a doctor legally, they have to have been really stupid. Sadlyfor the wro ged patient these doctors cover their backs very well.

It is easier to get redress if you are an nhs patient.

I wish you well Andrea, hope this gives you some relief from this ghastlycondition.

Regards Molly
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Re: surgery

Postby Alan1646 » Wed Jun 12, 2013 3:42 pm

I think that if you initially see a doctor privately and he/she then offers you treatment either privately or as an NHS patient, that is a positive sign. Also if you are having ongoing treatment as a private patient and your insurance company refuses to pay for more treatment, and the doctor then continues your treatment plan on the NHS, that is a positive sign that the treatment is necessary.
"if you want to keep a secret you must also hide it from yourself" Orwell
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