Mindbody Therapy

Accupuncture, Reiki, Cognitive Behavourial Therapy, Prolotheraphy, Radio Frequency, Hypnotherapy, Osteopathy and many more.

Re: Mindbody Therapy

Postby Dusty_in_Hope » Mon Jul 27, 2015 12:48 pm

Thanks again, Ezer. I've ordered his book 'A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose'.
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Re: Mindbody Therapy

Postby Dusty_in_Hope » Tue Aug 11, 2015 7:06 pm

I am endeavouring to follow a mind/body therapy approach in the hope that my pn-like pain will heal. However, I've found it somewhat difficult to recognise, name, feel and release my emotions (re what Ezer advised to try, in respect to his positive personal experience with mind/body work). Recently though I found a webpage, which is helping me to work on getting in touch and releasing my emotions and - as I have read other forum members express that they were/are also having difficulties - I thought I'd post a link to it, just in case it might help anyone else http://www.trans4mind.com/heart/emotions3.html#list1

Best to all :)

Dusty
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Re: Mindbody Therapy

Postby Dusty_in_Hope » Mon Oct 12, 2015 7:48 pm

Just thought I'd post - in case anyone might be interested - the following article http://www.decodedscience.org/distract- ... alth/45000 The research paper behind the 'distraction' technique described in the article re dealing with/'defusing' upsetting memories can be found here http://scan.oxfordjournals.org/content/ ... su039.full The technique is working wonderfully well for me. I haven't lost the memories of the upsetting events from my past that I have used the technique on, but I am now pretty indifferent to them and, so far - after a number of weeks - I continue to be indifferent to them.
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Re: Mindbody Therapy

Postby Jason32 » Thu Nov 19, 2015 4:12 pm

I just wanted to add what I think is some useful information to anyone interested in mindbody healing. A bit of background on myself- I fell down the stairs on my tailbone in June 2014. Pelvic pain symptoms started soon after. All the usual tests (MRI, rectal exams, etc.) showed nothing. I found this site, which scared me a lot since it fit me so well! I was about to give up and see a PNE Dr. when my wife came across the TMS forums. She kept saying "you have to read these people, they sound just like you!" Before the fall, I had suffered for about 15 years with one chronic pain syndrome after another (GERD, chronic sinusitis, chronic cough, attacks of vertigo, carpal tunnel, tinnitus, even prostatitis symptoms). The common thread in all these is that tests would show nothing, and eventually they would mysteriously vanish (sometimes it would take years), only to be quickly replaced by something else. I met Ezer on one of the TMS forums- I am not 100% cured but I have improved tremendously with his advice.

Ask yourself if you've ever had things like eye floaters, tinnitus, hyperacusis, vasovagal responses to certain things (I pass out with blood draws and eye exams, for example). I've had all of the above- this is stuff your brain should be tuning out. Chronic pain is the same way- the microphone is too sensitive, so to speak. It really ties together all the crazy problems I've had over the years.

This video from Daniel Clauw, MD, is a good intro: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgCfkA9RLrM

This list ranges from Doctors to neuroscientists to life coaches to spiritual leaders. All have written things related to chronic pain and mindbody healing in some form or another and are worth your time:

Michael Moskowitz, MD (http://www.neuroplastix.com)
Norman Doidge, MD (Books: "The Brain's Way of Healing", "The Brain that Changes itself")
Lorimer Moseley, PhD
John Sarno, MD (Books: "Healing back Pain", "The Mindbody Prescription", "The Divided Mind"*)
Howard Schubiner, MD
Steve Ozanich (Books: "The Great Pain Deception")
Abigail Steidley (she had symptoms very similar to PNE btw)
Monte Hueftle
John Kehoe (http://www.learnmindpower.com/articles/)
Eckhart Tolle
TMS forums (http://www.tmshelp.com/forum/ & http://www.tmswiki.org/forum/)

Disclaimer: I am not a Doctor, nor am I diagnosing anyone, and I have no financial or business relationship with any one I've recommended.


*A word of caution about this book: I would only read Sarno's chapters. He himself is very good, but some of the Doctors who wrote chapters in this book I've found are not that good. Me and some other people have spoken with some of them and it was a disappointment, to say the least.
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Re: Mindbody Therapy

Postby nonsequitur » Wed Mar 23, 2016 8:07 am

Mind-body therapy helps ease low back pain

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-healt ... SKCN0WO33B
http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.asp ... id=2504811

Psychosocial factors play important roles in pain and associated physical and psychosocial disability. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), another mind-body approach, focuses on increasing awareness and acceptance of moment-to-moment experiences including physical discomfort and difficult emotions.


Brand new study on back pain and mind body treatment vs. medical modalities. This is not about chronic pelvic pain I reckon but my experience and the experience of a few other members that have recovered from CPPS show that a parallel can be made.
“Unexpressed emotions will never die. They are buried alive and will come forth later in uglier ways.”
S.Freud
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Re: Mindbody Therapy

Postby Jason32 » Tue Mar 29, 2016 9:25 pm

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Re: Mindbody Therapy

Postby Jason32 » Thu Feb 16, 2017 10:14 pm

One more link I'd like to post that I've found perhaps more helpful than anything else: it's an overview on chronic pelvic pain syndromes and the mindbody connection with Alan Gordon, LCSW and a PN patient. The PN/PNE diagnosis is discussed in much detail as an increasingly common mindbody syndrome. It's a long video with a lot of info so it's probably helpful to listen several times:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fI8wFNgJf20
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Re: Mindbody Therapy

Postby nonsequitur » Fri Feb 24, 2017 6:54 am

Fantastic article on Somatization or Somatoform pain disorders:

http://www.drjosephcooper.com/wp-conten ... zation.pdf
“Unexpressed emotions will never die. They are buried alive and will come forth later in uglier ways.”
S.Freud
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Re: Mindbody Therapy

Postby Alan1646 » Mon Mar 27, 2017 6:04 pm

I found this interesting article : https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/ha ... c-symptoms
"Yet even when a patient accepts their symptom is being caused by an emotion-an exceptionally difficult barrier to surmount---the trauma that caused the symptom in the first place is often shown to be so ugly that both patient and doctor can readily understand why the patient's mind converted it into a physical symptom in the first place: even the mind itself believed the emotional trauma to be easier to handle that way"
The denial of stress seems to be inherent in conversion disorders. If unpleasant emotions have indeed been converted to a physical symptom, the patient is not always aware that they ever existed in the first place.

O'Sullivan, Suzanne. It's All in Your Head: Stories from the Frontline of Psychosomatic Illness (p. 277). Random House. Kindle Edition.
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Re: Mindbody Therapy

Postby Alan1646 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 3:27 pm

Over the weekend I've been reading a book by Suzanne O'Sullivan called "It's all in your head". It has really altered my view of my illness and has made me think deeply about how pain symptoms can be so real and so disabling yet can be caused entirely by the subconscious.
Honestly, I think everyone who has been diagnosed with a chronic pain illness for which there is no objective evidence of disease should read this book. I don't think a positive nerve block is objective evidence of bodily disease, as invariably it only temporarily-and at best- stops the symptom for a short period of time. Reports of cures after nerve blocks are as rare as hens' teeth. The evidence for "entrapment" is equally thin, and there has also been the recent study on cadavers that calls into question the notion that "entrapment" causes pudendal nerve pain. Why is it that people who have ligaments removed still have the pain?
Because of our social taboos about mental illness, most of us react forcefully against the idea that our pain could have a psychosomatic cause. and yet when you read this book you come to understand that a large proportion of doctors' consultations are taken up by patients who have no verifiable evidence of an organic disease and yet suffer from a range of troubling symptoms that are likely caused by their subconscious minds.
"pain is the commonest psychosomatic symptom and it is represented in every sort of hospital clinic."

O'Sullivan, Suzanne. It's All in Your Head: Stories from the Frontline of Psychosomatic Illness (p. 244). Random House. Kindle Edition.
The denial of stress seems to be inherent in conversion disorders. If unpleasant emotions have indeed been converted to a physical symptom, the patient is not always aware that they ever existed in the first place.

O'Sullivan, Suzanne. It's All in Your Head: Stories from the Frontline of Psychosomatic Illness (p. 277). Random House. Kindle Edition.
The denial of stress seems to be inherent in conversion disorders. If unpleasant emotions have indeed been converted to a physical symptom, the patient is not always aware that they ever existed in the first place.

O'Sullivan, Suzanne. It's All in Your Head: Stories from the Frontline of Psychosomatic Illness (p. 277). Random House. Kindle Edition.
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